Friday
August 3, 2012

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Church buys Poughkeepsie Armory


Seventh Day Adventists buy the armory for just over
a half million

POUGHKEEPSIE – The State Armory building on Market Street in the City of Poughkeepsie will soon be in the hands of an area church. The state auctioned off the structure Thursday with three bidders on the 23,000 SF building. The high bidder, the Seventh Day Adventist Church, was for $520,000.

Church representative Lloyd Schaffenberg said they know for what purposes they are buying the stately building.

“The plan is to use it for a house of worship, use it for community programs, health education, community outreach, probably recreational programs; a whole variety of things to benefit Poughkeepsie and the wider area,” Schaffenberg said.

The bidding started at $50,000 for the facility built in 1981 and situated on a half acre of land.  The State Office of General Services, which handled the auction, would not provide the names of the other two companies that bid.

The state surplused the facility when it moved the last remaining Army Reserve unit to a new consolidated facility.  Listed on both National and State Registers of Historic Places, the armory was once home of the 15th Separate Company, a local militia unit of the New York Army National Guard that dates back to the Spanish-American War. The facility most recently housed the 101st Signal Battalion.

A spokeswoman for the State OGS said they would hope to transfer the building to the church as soon as the closing process has been completed.

Since the building will now become a church, it will remain off the tax rolls as it has during its 120 year military history.

 


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